Inmate dating personals

While society at large has social media to thank for new friendships, relationships, insights and perspectives, inmates are doomed to total social exclusion, not only physical but psychological as well.Satisfying inmates’ need to reconnect with friends, family, and society at large plays a huge role in their rehabilitation.Friendship, community, a sense of belonging is what human beings crave for, and prisoners should not be deprived of that.Browse the inmate profiles, read some articles and then see if you can help make someone’s day in prison more bearable.With most services, inmates are charged to for a year-long post that reads much like a Twitter or Ok Cupid profile: “I wear my heart on my sleeve, and throw my soul into every friendship,” wrote Gerald Callahan on Cellblock Services.

We have sold hundreds of gift baskets throughout the years with each being a success.

Write APrisoner, along with Freedom Through Christ Prison Ministries, filed a lawsuit against the state of Florida, claiming that a rule prohibiting prisoners from posting online personal ads denied inmates the right to communicate with the outside world.

Department of Corrections officials said the guidelines were needed in order to prevent scams.

According to its homepage, the service has a “75 percent compatibility rating for those looking for their soul mates.” Christopher King, a VIP member, has received 5,449 views and his ad plays Michael Jackson’s “You Are Not Alone.” (The site’s VIP membership costs a year and includes a five-picture photo gallery and Facebook posts. So it was nice to get these cards from somebody who I didn’t even know.” As Salgado’s release date approached, Valdez invited him to move near her home in Southern California; he currently works as a maintenance man in an apartment complex.

Background music costs an additional .) For six years, engineer Monica Valdez exchanged letters with Octavio Salgado through Write while he was in a Nevada prison on drug-trafficking charges. “I know a lot of people [who sell drugs] that haven’t been caught.” The pair exchanged letters for five years before Salgado agreed to visit him in prison. “He tells me how one letter changed his whole life,” Valdez says.

Leave a Reply